Wire AC Router to SSR 1

Wire an AC Router to an SSR

Introduction

These instructions will show you a way to wire and integrate an AC Router into your CNC machine project using a solid-state relay (SSR). The instructions will be divided into 2 Parts, the first set of steps will show how to wire the router to the SSR. The second set will show you how to wire the SSR to your Breakout Board and a couple alternative ways to achieving this.

DO NOT HAVE YOUR ELECTRONICS, ROUTER OR EXTENSION CORD PLUGGED IN WHILE YOU WORKON THEM!
Check that you can see the pronged plugs of the router and extension cord are not plugged in.
Best practice – hold the plugs in your hand and visually trace the cords back to the router and other end of the extension cord. This will confirm they are not plugged in.

Parts Required

1. AC Router
Some routers detach from their bases, this type might make installation a bit easier as you will only need to make (or buy) a mount for the router component only.

2. Extension Cord
Your routers cord most likely will not be long enough to wire through your project. In this case you’ll need an extension cord to cut up and route through your machine. When choosing the cord’s length consider the path it must take through your machine, through your electronics enclosure, and then on to its power socket.  It’s better off to be a little longer than to short.

3. Solid State Relay – SSR
An SSR is basically an electric switch.  It will allow you to use a DC circuit (your breakout board) to turn off/on an AC device (your router). SSRs are usually ladled with their amperage capacity and which type of current is used to trigger it and what type of current it can switch. Please make sure the SSR you order ends in DA. The “DA”, as the “D” is first it means the low voltage trigger current is DC, and the “A” being second means it can switch off and on an AC current.

4. Rail terminal or similar
Rail Terminals are used reconnect wires after they have been cut. They are fairly cost effective and can be used by people who  don’t have access to soldering equipment. You can use any type of connector you have access to and is suitable for the task.

5. Wire 1.5mm
This will be used to wire the low voltage side of your SSR to your breakout board.

Tools Required

Wire cutter


Wire stripper



Small flathead screwdriver

How many AMPs is your Router?

It is important to calculate what amperage your router requires in order to get the correctly rated relay, rail terminal and extension cord that will be needed for your project.

Your routers power consumption is probably rated in watts, but you want to convert that to Amps. This is easy, just use the following formula:

Wattage/Voltage=Amperage

Examples:

  1. If the router is rated at 800 watts and your local AC power is supplied at 240 volts, then:

800w/240v= 3.3Amps

  1. If the router is rated at 800 watts and your local AC power is supplied at 110 volts, then:

800w/110v= 7.3Amps

  1. If the router is rated at 2000 watts and your local AC power is supplied at 110 volts, then:

2000w/110v= 18.2Amps

  1. If the router is rated at 2000 watts and your local AC power is supplied at 240 volts, then:

2000w/240v= 8.3Amps

Amperage capacities of extension cords, relays and rail connectors are usually rated in increments of 5, so choose items that are over your requirement and NEVER under.

For example 1 you’ll need a 5 amp extension cord, 5 amp Rail Terminal and a relay rated to 5 amps or more.

For examples 2 and 4 you’ll need a 10 amp extension cord, 10 amp Rail Terminal and a relay rated to 10 amps or more.

For example 3 you’ll need a 20 amp extension cord, 20 amp Rail Terminal and a relay rated to 20 amps or more.

STEP 01

Unplug Power Cords

Make sure both the extension cord you are going to use for your router and your CNC electronics are unplugged. Visually identify both the male plug ends of your cords and that they are not plugged in to wall sockets, place them on the bench beside you. If I sound like I’m repeating myself, well I am – its important!